Calendar of Events

Day With(out) Art: RADIANT PRESENCE Screening

Dec 4, 2015, 7:00pm

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Shan Kelley, “With Curators Like These, Who Needs A Cure,” 2015 oil paint, semen, resin on wood, 5 x 7 in. Courtesy Visual AIDS, New York.

Shan Kelley, "With Curators Like These, Who Needs A Cure," 2015 oil paint, semen, resin on wood, 5 x 7 in. Courtesy Visual AIDS, New York.

For the 26th annual Day With(out) Art, Visual AIDS is working with nine influential artists, activists, and curators—Bill Arning, Ian Alteveer, Chris Vargas, Rae Lewis-Thornton, Mark S. King, Allen Frame, Maria Mejia, Jack Mackenroth, and Kimberly Drew—to present RADIANT PRESENCE, a digital slideshow with images from the Visual AIDS’ Artist+ Registry, the largest database of works by artists with HIV/AIDS. CAM visitors are invited to experience the six-minute video on loop during December’s First Friday, starting at 7:00 pm.

At this point in the AIDS epidemic, over 39 million people have died of AIDS-related causes. The nature of the crisis has changed, however, so that nearly just as many people, 36 million, are living with HIV today. In this context, RADIANT PRESENCE showcases the resilience and vitality of Visual AIDS’ artist members and their artwork, preserving the radiance of those who have passed, while provoking dialogue about the needs and experiences of people living with HIV.

About Visual AIDS

Founded in 1988, Visual AIDS is the only contemporary arts organization fully committed to raising AIDS awareness and creating dialogue around HIV issues today, by producing and presenting visual art projects, exhibitions, public forums and publications - while assisting artists living with HIV/AIDS. We are committed to preserving and honoring the work of artists with HIV/AIDS and the artistic contributions of the AIDS movement. We embrace diversity and difference in our staff, leadership, artists and audiences.

About Day With(Out) Art

n 1989 in response to the worsening AIDS crisis and coinciding with the World Health Organization’s second annual World AIDS Day on December 1, Visual AIDS organized the first Day Without Art. A Visual AIDS committee of art workers (curators, writers, and art professionals) sent out a call for “mourning and action in response to the AIDS crisis” that would celebrate the lives and achievements of lost colleagues and friends; encourage caring for all people with AIDS; educating diverse publics about HIV infection; and finding a cure. More than 800 arts organizations, museums and galleries throughout the U.S. participated by shrouding artworks and replacing them with information about HIV and safer sex, locking their doors or dimming their lights, and producing exhibitions, programs, readings, memorials, rituals, and performances. In 1998, for its 10th anniversary, Day Without Art became Day With(out) Art. Visual AIDS added the parentheses to highlight the ongoing inclusion of art projects focused on the AIDS pandemic, and to encourage programming of artists living with HIV.