Lyndon Barrois Jr.: Of Color

Lyndon Barrois Jr.: Of Color

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Lyndon Barrois Jr.: Of Color, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, May 6–August 21, 2016. Photo: David Johnson.

Lyndon Barrois Jr.: Of Color, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, May 6–August 21, 2016. Photo: David Johnson.

Lyndon Barrois Jr.: Of Color, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, May 6–August 21, 2016. Photo: David Johnson.

Lyndon Barrois Jr.: Of Color, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, May 6–August 21, 2016. Photo: David Johnson.Lyndon Barrois Jr.: Of Color, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, May 6–August 21, 2016. Photo: David Johnson.Lyndon Barrois Jr.: Of Color, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, May 6–August 21, 2016. Photo: David Johnson.

Through a multi-disciplinary practice including installation, painting, and sculpture, Lyndon Barrois Jr. examines questions of aesthetic value, race and representation, and the creation of meaning through imagery in popular culture. Part of the 2016 Great Rivers Biennial, the installation Of Color situates eight life-size assemblages onto an asphalt basketball court, re-creating an outdoor setting within the gallery space. Both abstract and anthropomorphic, each mixed-media sculpture combines cropped images of athletes and fashion models with pictures of domestic objects culled from lifestyle and sports magazines. The images are transformed into rigid free-standing props and positioned onto boxes of printer toner. Visually recalling players in the midst of a scrimmage game, Barrois Jr.’s sculptures are separated into two teams, one printed in color, the other in grayscale. While seemingly divided into opposing chromatic groups, all of the players are unified by the halftone dots that make up their original source material.

The individual works—as well as Barrois Jr.’s repositioning of an outdoor basketball court inside the protected space of a museum—ask viewers to consider how people, cultures, and lifestyles typically sited on the periphery can gain visibility in a new context. Drawing parallels between athletic movements and sculptural forms, Barrois Jr. connects ideas of sport and spectacle while raising issues of objectification.

Lyndon Barrois Jr. (b. 1983, New Orleans) lives and works in St. Louis. Recent solo exhibitions include For the Benefit of Man, Garwood Gallery, Western Illinois University, Macomb (2015), and Float, Fort Gondo Compound for the Arts, St. Louis (2014). Group exhibitions include You are Looking Good, A Real Good Looker, Chicago Artist Coalition, Chicago (2016), and A Donkey is a Lion. Insecticide, A Message from God, Blackburn 20/20 Gallery, New York (2015). Barrois Jr. received his MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Art at Washington University in St. Louis.

This exhibition is made possible by the Gateway Foundation.

The 2016 Great Rivers Biennial is organized for the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis by Jeffrey Uslip, Deputy Director for Exhibitions and Programs / Chief Curator.