Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013

Jan 24, 2014 - Apr 13, 2014

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Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.

Nicole Eisenman, Sloppy Bar Room Kiss, 2011. Oil on canvas, 39 x 48 inches. Collection of Cathy and Jonathan Miller. Courtesy Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Nicole Eisenman, The Triumph of Poverty, 2009. Oil on canvas, 65 x 82 inches. Private collection. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.

Nicole Eisenman, Watermark, 2012. Etching and aquatint; paper size: 24 x 29 inches; image size: 18 x 24 inches. Edition of 25. Published by Harlan & Weaver, New York.

Nicole Eisenman, Half King, 2011. Oil and ink on paper, 58 1/4 x 53 inches. Private collection. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.

Nicole Eisenman, Breakup, 2011. Oil and mixed media on panel, 56 x 43 inches. Collection of Robert and Bonnie Friedman, Los Angeles. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Nicole Eisenman, Springtime Kiss, 2011. Oil on canvas, 40 x 41 ½ inches. Collection of Gilbert and Doreen Bassin, New York. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Nicole Eisenman, Deep Sea Diver, 2007. Oil on canvas, 82 x 65 inches. Collection of Joachim Splichal, Pasadena, California. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Nicole Eisenman, Man Holding His Shadow, 2011. Two-color lithograph, 22 1⁄4 x 18 inches Published by Jungle Press Editions, New York. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.

Nicole Eisenman, Untitled, 2012. Woodcut; image and paper size: 29 5/8 x 22 3/8 inches. Published by 10 Grand Press. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.

Nicole Eisenman, Untitled, 2011. Monotype on paper, 24 1⁄4 x 18 3⁄4 inches. Private collection. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, installation view, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, January 24-April 13, 2014. Photo: David Johnson.Nicole Eisenman, Sloppy Bar Room Kiss, 2011. Oil on canvas, 39 x 48 inches. Collection of Cathy and Jonathan Miller. Courtesy Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert WedemeyerNicole Eisenman, The Triumph of Poverty, 2009. Oil on canvas, 65 x 82 inches. Private collection. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.Nicole Eisenman, Watermark, 2012. Etching and aquatint; paper size: 24 x 29 inches; image size: 18 x 24 inches. Edition of 25. Published by Harlan & Weaver, New York.Nicole Eisenman, Half King, 2011. Oil and ink on paper, 58 1/4 x 53 inches. Private collection. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.Nicole Eisenman, Breakup, 2011. Oil and mixed media on panel, 56 x 43 inches. Collection of Robert and Bonnie Friedman, Los Angeles. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert WedemeyerNicole Eisenman, Springtime Kiss, 2011. Oil on canvas, 40 x 41 ½ inches. Collection of Gilbert and Doreen Bassin, New York. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert WedemeyerNicole Eisenman, Deep Sea Diver, 2007. Oil on canvas, 82 x 65 inches. Collection of Joachim Splichal, Pasadena, California. Courtesy the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects. Photo: Robert WedemeyerNicole Eisenman, Man Holding His Shadow, 2011. Two-color lithograph, 22 1⁄4 x 18 inches Published by Jungle Press Editions, New York. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.Nicole Eisenman, Untitled, 2012. Woodcut; image and paper size: 29 5/8 x 22 3/8 inches. Published by 10 Grand Press. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.Nicole Eisenman, Untitled, 2011. Monotype on paper, 24 1⁄4 x 18 3⁄4 inches. Private collection. Courtesy the artist and Koenig & Clinton, New York.

Gallery Guide
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The largest definitive mid-career survey of the work of celebrated American artist Nicole Eisenman to date, Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 19932013 includes more than 120 works, charting the development of Eisenman's practice across painting, printmaking, and drawing from the 1990s to the present.

Over the past twenty years, Eisenman has developed a creative and versatile vision that combines high and low culture with virtuosic skill. Fusing centuries-old art-making conventions and a multitude of art historic influences—including impressionism, German expressionism, and twentieth-century social realist painting—with contemporary subject matter, she depicts settings and themes as varied as bar scenes, motherhood, and the plight of the artist. Among her core concerns are depictions of community, identity, and sexuality.

Eisenman’s continual representation of women (both “butch” and “femme”) and female love not only imbues the practice of figurative painting with an audaciously queer bent but also recasts art history in a feminist light. Her wit spares no one and nothing, and it is indeed through her humor and the discomfort caused by her work that she communicates the multifaceted richness of the human condition. Her incisive sociopolitical critique operates through the quotidian and the absurd, in ways that are both formally playful and visually breathtaking.

Nicole Eisenman (b. 1965, Verdun, France) lives and works in New York City. Eisenman was recently awarded the Carnegie Prize for her work in the 2013 Carnegie International. Recent solo exhibitions include MATRIX 248, Berkeley Art Museum (2013); ‘Tis but a scratch’ ‘A scratch?! Your arm’s off!’ ‘No, it isn’t.,’ Studio Voltaire, London (2012); Nicole Eisenman: The Way We Weren’t, The Tang Museum, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY (2009); and Nicole Eisenman, Kunsthalle Zurich (2007). Her work has been featured in numerous group exhibitions such as NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star, New Museum, New York (2013); the Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2012, 1995); Prospect.2 New Orleans (2011); and 100 Artists See God, The Jewish Museum, San Francisco (2004); among many others. Eisenman is the recipient of several awards including a John Simon Guggenheim Grant, The Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant, and The Louis Comfort Tiffany Grant. Her work is in the collections of many museums including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and The Ludwig Museum, Cologne.

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 19932013 is organized for the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis by Kelly Shindler, Associate Curator.

Sponsors

Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 19932013 is generously supported by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; Koenig & Clinton, New York; Karin and Peter Haas; Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects; Ringier AG, Zurich; and Richard Gerrig and Timothy Peterson. Following its showing at CAM, the exhibition will travel to the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania in fall 2014.